Limp Wrist Launch Party!

Last night was the Limp Wrist launch party at Outwrite, and it was fantastic event. We started off with a minute silence in memory of Lawrence King. If you haven’t heard of Lawrence King read the NY TIMES article that I’ve linked; then take a moment and Google his name. His story is tragic and needs to be shared.

Laure-Anne Bosselaar was the guest of honor and started off the night. Then I read followed by Collin Kelley and Stacie Boschma. Lisa Allender and Genevieve Lyons rounded out the night– these talented poets graciously read in place of two other poets. Lisa read for Beth Gylys and Genevieve for Denise Duhamel.

There was such good energy in the bookstore for which I am glad and thankful. The evening went off without a hitch. A dear friend of mine, Greg, took tons of pictures of the event. I’m going to meet in a week or so for a drink and to receive the CD with the pictures. (can’t wait!)

I have to give a shout out to Cousin’s Bakery for donating cookies for the event as well as Jenny Allen for donating some her tasty Jenny J’s Cheese Dip. Please contact me if you’d like more information on Cousin’s or Jenny J’s.

I give a hearty THANK YOU to Phillip Rafshoon, Outwrite owner. When I contacted Phillip about wanting to do the launch party at Outwrite, there was never a hesitation about making it happen. Phillip is unbelievably supportive to the GLTB community in Atlanta, so stop by Outwrite when you’re in the city!

Advertisements

"Bill to increase parental control on Internet"

Bill to increase parental control on Internet

By ANDREA JONES
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Published on: 02/26/08

Georgia could take the lead soon on some of the strictest legislation in the nation aimed at Internet predators.

This week, a bill is expected to reach the floor of the state Senate that would force sex offenders to submit their e-mail addresses to authorities and require Internet service providers to offer parents the ability to block certain Web sites.

The bill, sponsored by Sen. Cecil Staton (R-Macon), also would require schools to offer an annual course on online safety to students in grades three and higher.

“This is the first comprehensive legislation of its kind in the country,” Staton said.
It is the second bill Staton has introduced aimed at tightening parental controls and curbing access to cyberspace for sexual predators.

Last session, he proposed legislation that would make it illegal for social networking Web sites Myspace and Facebook to allow minors to create or update online profiles without parental permission. That bill did not make it to the floor and industry officials said it would be nearly impossible to enforce.

The new bill is a good compromise, Staton said.

Georgia is not the only state taking aim at social networking sites after a spate of high-profile sexual attacks by those who met their prey online.

“With 50 state legislatures, the sites are sort of facing an onslaught,” Staton said. “We have been working with various representatives over the last months to create a bill that was more comprehensive.”

Last year, Myspace began offering free parental notification software, the latest step in a series of efforts to try to protect young users from online predators. That software enables parents to know the name, age and location their children are using on the Web site but prevents them from reading their children’s e-mail or see their profile page.

In October, Facebook officials reached a settlement with New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo in which they agreed to respond and begin addressing complaints about nudity or pornography or unwelcome contact within 24 hours of receiving them. The site also agreed to tell the complainant within 72 hours what steps it had taken.

"Save the Buckhead Library"

A friend on the APC Committee sent me the email below, so I wanted to share it:

Friends,
I know this is not Midtown; and whether you “like” Deconstructivist Architecture or not, the point is that many do not understand nor do they appreciate the Buckhead Library’s place in Atlanta architectural history. We all know that Atlanta has very few unique buildings. Why does everything in Atlanta have to be brand new, “developed” and made of EIFS?

If interested, please follow the four steps below, if you feel so inclined.

1. READ: By the book: Buckhead library may be razed

2. SIGN: Click here for the petition

3. ATTEND: Save the Buckhead Library Forum, February 21, 2008, from6:00 PM – 8:00 PM at the Architecture Auditorium, East Architecture Building.

4. PASS THIS INFORMATION ON!

William H. Herbig
Director of Urban Design . Midtown Alliance


Also, there has been a blog created for the cause– Save the Library

"Why Do I Write" ~ Kurt Brown

Why Do I Write ~ Kurt Brown


The question, for me, is unanswerable and surely almost everything in my life and experience argues against it. If I could help myself, I wouldn’t write at all.

I read somewhere that John Keats said if everything he’d ever written was destroyed overnight, he’d get up the next morning and start writing again. I’m only paraphrasing, but something like that applies to me when it comes to writing. Not being John Keats, of course, but the insane urge to keep writing words and arranging sentences into lines looking for that one good poem that someone else might find moving and important and crucial to their life. One good poem. A person could spend his whole life pursuing that, and never achieve it. And as soon as one poem is finished, which he might think is good and strong—a real poem, that is—he discards it as a failure, and begins working on another poem, hoping this time for success.

The process usually goes something like this: some phrase or subject or idea piques my interest, and at one point or another I begin to write; then I become captivated by the idea, and the writing, and I work hard until I think the poem is finished; then I experience a sense of euphoria, because I am still in the halo of intensity it took to write the poem, and I think “This is a good one, this is a real poem”; then, over the next few days, as I read the poem over and over again, I begin to see it is rather ordinary, flawed, a failure in fact. It has been robbed of its initial glory by a more sober approach, by the time it takes to as assess it with an objective eye. Which is the eye of a reader, not the writer. Then I vow never to write again. Then, slowly, after a few days or weeks, I begin another poem. This is what I meant by the word “insane” above.

Maybe, like Keats, everything I’ve ever written is destroyed—over and over and over again. I write in hopes of writing one good poem. I live for it.

NOTE: This may seem melodramatic to some, and I understand why. Some of the best poets I’ve ever known have a much cooler, more skeptical view of writing. Perhaps they only backed into it, initially dreaming about becoming something else. Not every artist is passionate about his art. If, as Edward Hirsch claims, being drawn to poetry—and to write—is something like falling in love with a real person, then I fell in love a long time ago and I’ve never gotten over it. Perhaps it’s the Muse I love, and she disdains me. Isn’t that the plot of a thousand novels and television shows? A little less passion might help my writing. I live for that, too.

Laure-Anne Bosselaar at Java Monkey

Laure-Anne read at Java Monkey last night, and she was spectacular. Every single poem she read is fabulous. I could worship the paper she writes on.

I’m thrilled and honored that Laure-Anne is attending and reading at the Limp Wrist launch party at Outwrite on 2/28/08. The first issue will contatin an interview with the lovely Laure-Anne. Besides reading some of her work, Laure-Anne will do a Q&A session. If you have a question you’d like to ask Laure-Anne please send it in an email to dustinvbrookshire@gmail.com prior to Feb. 27 with the subject reading “question for Laure-Anne.”

Key West Lit Seminar Open Mic

While at the Key West Literary Seminar, I participated in an open mic. uVu Channel 2 taped a number of the seminar participants and put us online. Click here to see me read a poem by Denise Duhamel and two of my own– “HIV Barbie” and “Missing Names.”

Besides this being my first time having a public recording of me reading, this was my first time being censored. In “Missing Names” the work cocksucker is muted out. What’s that about? I say slut and whore……. but cocksucker is muted. Twisted!

If you watch, I hope you enjoy.